Main Menu

 Home 

 Software 
    - Driver 
    - Graphic & Design 
    - Internet 
    - MacOSX 
    - Multimedia 
    - Office 
    - Portable 
    - Security 
    - System 

 Music 
    - Mp3 
    - Music Video 

 Games 
    - PC 
    - Console 

 Books 
    - Audiobook 
    - Comic 
    - eBook 
    - Magazine 
    - Video Training 

 Movies 
    - Amine 
    - Cam 
    - DVD 
    - HD/BluRay 
    - TV Show 
    - Documentary 

 Graphics 
    - 3D Model 
    - icon 
    - Font 
    - Footage 
    - Photoshop 
    - Template 
    - Vector 
    - Stock 
    - Script/Plugin 
    - Wallpaper 

 Mobile 
    - iOS 
    - Android 
 
 
 
   Books / eBook : Strategic Sisterhood: The National Council of Negro Women in the Black Freedom Struggle
Strategic Sisterhood: The National Council of Negro Women in the Black Freedom Struggle

Strategic Sisterhood: The National Council of Negro Women in the Black Freedom Struggle by Rebecca Tuuri
2018 | ISBN: 1469638908, 1469638894 | English | 338 pages | EPUB | 12 MB

When women were denied a major speaking role at the 1963 March on Washington, Dorothy Height, head of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW), organized her own women's conference for the very next day. Defying the march's male organizers, Height helped harness the womanpower waiting in the wings. Height's careful tactics and quiet determination come to the fore in this first history of the NCNW, the largest black women's organization in the United States at the height of the civil rights, Black Power, and feminist movements of the 1960s and 1970s.

Offering a sweeping view of the NCNW's behind-the-scenes efforts to fight racism, poverty, and sexism in the late twentieth century, Rebecca Tuuri examines how the group teamed with U.S. presidents, foundations, and grassroots activists alike to implement a number of important domestic development and international aid projects. Drawing on original interviews, extensive organizational records, and other rich sources, Tuuri's work narrates the achievements of a set of seemingly moderate, elite activists who were able to use their personal, financial, and social connections to push for change as they facilitated grassroots, cooperative, and radical activism.

Buy Premium Account To Get Resumable Support & Max Speed




Links are Interchangeable - No Password
 

 

Back to Top